Message from the President - March 2024 RWR

In the March issue of the RWR, Clair Brett shares a message for Women's History Month.

Read more...
 

Plot and Pacing Pointers for Today's Commercial Fiction

By Jane Porter
Posted on 3/14/2024

In the thirteen-plus years it took me to sell my first book, I learned a lot about the craft of writing, and how to develop characters and focus my dialogue, but I continued to struggle with pacing, receiving nice rejections that loved my heroes, and the sexual tension, but editors weren’t pleased with my “uneven pacing”, or “sagging middle”, and so I stopped submitting and spent a year studying my craft.  Now pacing is one of my strengths.

Read more...
 

Chapter Spotlight: Romance Writers of America/NYC Inc.

Spotlighting RWA chapters
Posted on 3/14/2024

Our chapter was started in 1986. Currently we have 43 members. Since we conduct our monthly meetings via Zoom, our members attend from all over the US. This year we have two new board members, Candace Lucas (Katy Berritt) as president and Jean Joachim as treasurer while Barbara James continues to act as secretary and Ursula Shand (Renee) as program committee chairman.

Read more...
 

Unlock the Mystery of Pacing: Make Sure Your Reader Knows How to Keep Score

By Helen C. Johannes
Posted on 3/14/2024

Not knowing what’s at stake for the characters in a story/scene is like watching a game in a sport where you have no idea of the rules or even the teams. There’s a lot of noise and movement, but if you don’t know what it means—who’s winning and who’s losing—you’re soon bored and ready to leave.

Read more...
 

Voices Carry As You Know, Bob: When Characters Need to Shut Up

By Siri Caldwell
Posted on 3/14/2024

Dialogue is a great tool for telling your story, but it’s not your only tool.

In certain situations, dialogue can backfire. One such situation is affectionately known as “As You Know, Bob.”

Read more...
 

What Keeps A Reader Reading?

By Helen C. Johannes
Posted on 2/8/2024

Story and character, obviously. If a reader is engaged in the story, she/he wants to know what happens next. But how do authors hook the reader into turning those pages well past bedtime or the end of lunch break/commute?

Read more...
 

Chapter Spotlight: Hearts Through History

Spotlighting RWA chapters
Posted on 2/8/2024

The Hearts Through History chapter of RWA discusses different aspects of the historical romance genre and how we as writers can further promote romance fiction.

Read more...
 

One Question, Three Perspectives: How to Pitch Like a Pro

By Ann Kellett
Posted on 2/8/2024

New to pitching—and perhaps even a little (or a lot) intimidated by the whole process? Join the club!

Read more...
 

Writing "Stupid"

By Janet W. Butler
Posted 2/8/2024

What’s your first thought when you see the title above?

Do you think of being "freed" to write badly, to have "dreck" as a first draft, knowing it’s only your starting point? That you can make notes to yourself about “stuff” you don’t know, or places where you don’t have a clue what comes next, and correct the lapses later?

Read more...
 

What's the Problem? Or, Writing Convincing Conflict (Part 2)

By Janet W. Butler
Posted on 2/8/2024

Writing conflict can get us a bit conflicted ourselves at times, no?

It can prompt occasional stints of hair-pulling. Our own, mostly. (It is to be hoped.)

How does this happen?

Several ways.

Read more...
 

Voices Carry

By J.E. Dyer
Posted 2/8/2024

Character dialogue. It’s a blessing for some writers and a bane for the rest of us. Like it or not, though, it plays a pivotal role in any and every story you create. What your characters say performs double or even triple duty, carrying essential information about worldbuilding, subtext, and character development for your reader. Writing dialogue exchanges doesn’t have to be daunting or painful. In this article, we’ll take a look at the biggest culprit for flat dialogue and explore several methods to help it leap off your pages.

Read more...
 
<< first < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > last >>

Page 3 of 41